changing

Joy of Changing Lives

Have you ever experienced the joy of changing a life?  That is precisely why Salem Christian School exists.  We desire to change lives and make an eternal impact.  If I may, I would like to share with you why Salem Christian School is an eternal investment worth making.  This school, since its inception in 1979, has been dedicated to developing students who love God with all their mind, body, and soul through challenging academics and a vibrant student life.  Furthermore, we are seeking partners who understand our mission and share our passion for the next generation.
It is exciting to be part of a growing school.  Salem Christian School has been growing in many aspects beyond enrollment and programs.  Our school has grown in its hunger for excellence.  It has developed a strong college and career guidance program.  It has added numerous programs and academic courses for students.  We have seen God answering prayers, giving direction, and blessing us in ways that were unexpected. God willing, our future looks bright.

In addition to some positive growth, during our recent self-study we found some areas that we need to address within our strategic plan.  Currently, we are engaged in procuring 6 desperately needed classrooms in addition to refurbishing some current space in order to accommodate an expanding program and student body.  Additionally, we have begun addressing our gymnasium needs.  We have been blessed with a gymnasium that is heavily used for co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.  In fact, 96% of our students are involved in extra-curricular activities that use the gymnasium.  We are very grateful for what God has provided and continue to use what we have to His glory.  We are committed to no debt; therefore, we need to raise an additional $200,000 to meet these completion and gymnasium renovation needs.   But, we know that He has great things in store for this important ministry in the future and always supplies what His ministries need.
We humbly request that you invest into Salem Christian School so that we can address the needed programmatic, infra-structure, and physical plant upgrades.  If you desire any additional information, please let me know.  We want you to be as confident in your investment of financial resources as we are.


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Teach Them Intolerance

LET’S TEACH OUR CHILDREN TO BE INTOLERANT!  Yes, I do mean this without any reservations.  But, first, we must understand when and how to do so.  Why should we tolerate things that are harmful and wrong?  Why should we accept the political correctness that squashes the Gospel?  We shouldn’t, and we should teach our children not to be so tolerant to these ideologies.  But, we must teach them to be tolerant and accepting of the people who espouse those ideas.  Can it be done?  If the Bible is true, then yes.  It can.  After all, we are told to love the sinner and hate the sin.  Isn’t it the same?

I read a quote by Dr. Machen recently and was intrigued.  Beyond the heady intellectualism of the words I found a truth that haunted me for days.  I already admit that I am different in that sense.  Most people would move on and forget the quote quickly.  I could not.

“Involuntary organizations ought to be tolerant, but voluntary organizations, so far as the fundamental purpose of their existence is concerned, must be intolerant or else cease to exist.”
― J. Gresham MachenChristianity and Liberalism

I was haunted about the immense privilege and responsibility of Christian school students, parents, and educators.    We voluntarily choose this organization.  We choose to immerse ourselves in the Truth each day.  We are a voluntary organization of folks who choose to ensure that the truth is instilled into the next generation, equipping them to change their future trajectory towards a more sacred path.

If Dr. Machen is correct, then we as believers who choose to follow Christ must be intolerant to the offenses against God’s truth.  We must stand up boldly and bravely proclaiming the Gospel and his truth.  However, in order to do so, we must ourselves understand God has absolutes for us to follow.  We must transform our minds to think like Christ.   Then, we must teach our children so they can be intolerant.  Why should we ever accept the counterfeit that steals of us of our purpose?

Mind you, I am saying that we be intolerant of the things creeping into our voluntary organization of Christ followers. I am not saying we should be intolerant of the people who are selling them.  To them, we show love and compassion while pointing out their goods are rotten.  Perhaps, we can persuade them with the prodding of the Holy Spirit to see that our organization is necessary.

Now can you see why it haunted me?  I could not shake the weight of my calling as a follower of Christ and educator.   It impressed on me the importance of teaching intolerance of the worldly things that are pervasive in our thought.  Are you ready to be intolerant? So, let’s be intolerant! Furthermore, let’s teach our children to be intolerant of the secular ideologies that are swallowing their eternal hope all the while loving those that don’t understand the harm they cause.


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Things I Remember

Submitted by Taylor Reinhard ’12

One of the best things Salem offers is that it is a place where both great memories along with lasting friendships are formed. Some of my favorite memories in life stem from things that happened at Salem, whether it was during class, sports, or trips, and I still have friends that I graduated high school with that I see on a regular basis, because our friendships went beyond the time we spent with each other from 8:30am to 3:00pm Monday through Friday. These however are not the only friendships I developed at Salem, and this leads to what I think is the most special part of Salem, the teachers. I would be lying if I said that I loved every single subject and class I took during my time at Salem, but I would not be lying if I said that I felt like every teacher I had, especially in high school, carried a genuine care not only for the education of their students, but for their overall well-being and walk with Christ.
I recently graduated from college with a Bachelor’s of Science in Music and Worship, and will be using my gifts in music at a church in North Jersey to help them in their effort to further God’s kingdom in their communities. I didn’t even realize I had a passion for music until my senior year of high school when I first began taking guitar lessons, so I can safely say that no one at Salem pushed me to study music. What they did push me towards was the idea that a life in which we follow God’s plan and will for our lives instead of our own is the fullest life that we can live, and that often that means putting other people ahead of ourselves. It’s not important by what means I reach people for Christ, only that I reach them. These are the values Salem instilled in me, and continues to instill in its students today.
I learned plenty at Salem academically, and even felt confident in my education throughout college compared to other students, but it’s the things I learned outside of my textbooks that changed me forever. I may never be able to remember everything I learned about World War 1, or how to find the area of a trapezoid, and my grammar would not be nearly as good as it is without modern technology, but whose would? What I know I’ll never forget is that my life should always be pointing back to Christ, and that there is nothing more important than loving other people the way that Christ loves them. These are the things that were not only taught, but shown to me during my thirteen years at Salem Christian School, and for that, I am forever grateful.

By Taylor Reinhard, ‘12


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O’Come, O’Come Emmanuel!

I grew up in a Christian home with a history of many generations of family on each side that would consider themselves followers of Christ.  Because we worshiped in a Baptist church, we never practiced all the liturgical parts of the Christian faith that many other denominations practice.  Needless to say, I didn’t know much about Advent.  As an adult, I have come to value some of these traditions of the faith, like Advent.   I have come to appreciate the desire to focus myself on what this holiday is declaring.  Christmas is a highly symbolic holiday.  I hope that it brings me and you to a place of worship.

I have no doubt that Christmastime is always a special time for most everyone and moreover so for those of us who are followers of Jesus. Christmas is celebrated all across this planet in a variety of ways. Families have traditions that are often passed down from generation to generation.

Sometimes the traditions are not even understood by younger family members but are practiced and celebrated anyway.  Churches and religions have traditions too. One such tradition practiced by many religions is the Advent Season.  But what does “Advent” mean?  The word “advent” comes from the Latin “adventus” meaning “arrival” or “coming,” particularly of something having great importance. The first coming of Jesus Christ was the most significant historical event that has ever occurred.  The “arrival” of the promised Messiah has changed the world forever.

You are probably aware that Advent is the period of four Sundays and weeks before Christmas Day.  Advent means ‘Coming’ in Latin. This is the coming of Jesus into the world.  Many Christians use the four Sundays and weeks of Advent to prepare and remember the real meaning of Christmas.
Interestingly, there are three meanings of ‘coming’ that Christians describe in Advent.  The first, and most thought of, happened over 2000 years ago when Jesus came into the world as a baby to live as a man and die for us. The second can happen now as Jesus wants to come into our lives now.  And the third will happen in the future when Jesus comes back to the world as King and Judge, not a baby.  Knowing this has given me a newfound love for an already beloved Christmas hymn, ‘O Come, O Come Emmanuel!’

As a believer I want to absorb everything this holiday represents.   I want t to look forward to Jesus.  I want to look forward to his birth.  Furthermore, I want to look forward to his coming again.  I hope that the symbolism of Advent will help me meditate more on what Jesus means to me and the world.  I want to better recognize his authority as the King of Kings.  I am thankful that I have a source of truth in a culture that doesn’t recognize the existence of Truth.  I want to revel in the miracle of the Virgin Mary’s giving birth to Jesus Christ.  And, I want to be able to share the good news and prepare myself for the teaching of Jesus Christ in anticipation of His return.  Will you join me in celebrating all that is yet to come because of what Jesus Christ did for us?


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